Friends

06 April 2012

Rookery Park

Introducing Rookery Park

Rookery House grounds are now classed as a small park but once upon a time those grounds surrounded a mansion. The following is a description found on the Internet which gives more detail.

'Rookery House in North Birmingham, was built circa 1724/5 and is a white three storied Georgian mansion with a slated roof that contains some 36 rooms, with some Victorian additions including a number of outbuildings referred to as the Stables. The house is a Grade II listed building and contains plaster and timber mouldings, cast iron mouldings, unfurled Doric Columns at the entrance, and decorative columns in the ‘Ball Room’. Rookery House has, via the granddaughter of the original owner, associations with William Wilberforce whose actions led to the abolition of slavery in Britain.

Rookery House enjoys a number of visitors daily. The park includes tennis courts, two play areas for young and older children, a formal Italian sunken garden and a large open area with a football pitch in winter months. The park is maintained by staff who use offices within Rookery House itself and it has been agreed that Birmingham Council will continue to rent offices in the house while restoration process is proceeding.'

The area around the house has considerable archaeological interest.'

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I don't know when the agreement was made but there certainly seems to be no hurry reaching a decision on the future of this once lovely building.

The gardeners continue to maintain the grounds

varying the flower schemes as each season changes




Isn't it sad that such a lovely house should be allowed to decline to this state. It isn't yet known what it will be used for... someone suggested a supermarket, a comment I hope wasn't heard by anyone in authority.

A sad house ..
.
... and a depressed bench!

10 comments:

Jenny Woolf said...

Disgraceful. Whoever left it to the city will be turning in his grave. A community centre - they should look at Lauderdale house in Highgate. A wonderful place which is such an asset to the are. aren't there any community groups that would take it on?

Barbara said...

Hi Valerie,

What a shame. There are so many beautiful and useful ways to use such a building. I would also think like Jenny, community groups.

It looks like a pretty garden to walk in; it is sad for the rest.

Brian Miller said...

i would love to walk around it...what beautiful gardens...sad that its future is up int he air...i feel for that bench...

Ron said...

"someone suggested a supermarket."

OMG, you're kidding me? Yes, that is sad, very sad indeed.

And it's odd how the grounds looks so manicured and alive, yet the house itself is clearly neglected - they don't match.

Beautiful photos, dear lady. The colors you captured of the garden are stunning!

Thank you for sharing this very interesting post. I really enjoyed reading it!

Have a great weekend.....X

Star said...

Oh! that really is sad Valerie. Such a lovely old house with lots of history attached to it. We should be proud of it and make it available for people to view. Perhaps the National Trust will take it on?
I know how proud the Americans are of their 'special' houses and they would love to have somewhere like this to call their own.

As Jenny says, it's disgraceful.

Valerie said...

Hi all. Thank you for commenting on this item. I have been scouting round for more information on the old building... more to follow on this disgusting state of affairs when I get it written up.

Don't unplug your hub. said...

It'll be turned into flats. Some people will make lots of money. Hope I'm wrong.

Blogaire said...

Time to start a "Save Rookery" campaign methinks. Once you lose a lovely old treasure like this it can never be replaced ...
Happy Easter Valerie :)

L. D. Burgus said...

It looks like a beautiful place to visit. I can't believe all the mixtures of colors in some of those beds. The sun is shinning the day you were there. Great!

CrystalChick said...

The grounds are very nice. I hope the building can be restored.